Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Product Review: Kodak EasyShare Camera

Product Review on Kodak EasyShare CX7330 3.2 Mpixal Camera

From a minimalist perspective.

This camera is just about one year old, and the equivalent camera today will have about 6 or 7 MegaPixals

Overall I am very happy with this choice of camera.

It does have a few irritants, but I found it is easy to learn the basics well enough to take some pretty good snapshots.

We only use the camera to take about 10 pictures per month. We have taken a couple of videos by mistake (one of only two irritants is that if you turn the on/off knob in the wrong direction, it goes into video mode.)

I use the review and flash way more than most people (I would guess) - so batteries only lasted about 6 months but were easy to replace (and the old ones powered my flashlight for quite a while. One irritant here though, there was very little warning when the batteries died. I don't know if the little "low battery" indicator was on - but I didn't notice it. Maybe something a little more annoying would be in order. Maybe I am overly sensitive since the batteries went dead a mile into a cave tour :-/

Transferring pictures is where this camera really shines. The method is essentially connect the USB cable and click. It gives you the opportunity to name an album to put the photo's into - which you could also do on the camera itself.

The pictures are transferred in JPEG format, with each being from 550 Mb to 1550 Mb in size. Since they are in a standard format, any number of programs can be used to manipulate, transfer or print them.

Tuesday, September 27, 2005

Lessons Learned

Many lessons will be learned from hurricanes Katrina and Rita, but I suspect some will be missed. Here are a few examples.

Corpus Christie: Don't get too far ahead of the game. Some evacuation, such as the islands, was prudent, but mandatory evacuation of the entire city was overkill.

Houston: Even the best plans aren't good enough when you keep having to shift gears.
I would say they did a good job overall.

Galveston and other coastal areas: As the hurricane begins to land, KILL THE ELECTRIC GRID. Didn't we learn this from Florida last year? Are we dense?

All affected areas: Civil defense needs hardened communications. And that includes media. It does no good to plan to provide news and information if you don't have stations on the air. And tell them which stations will be on the air for them. Tell them before the storm.

Plan for returns. Don't just tell people they can't go back home. Tell them the roads into those areas are closed. And make sure it is true.

Thursday, September 15, 2005

Military in route to Paperless operations

Those of you who subscribe to the Military.Com newsletter got notice a couple of days ago that the military pay system is trying to end the use of snail mail for earnings statements and other paperwork that includes SSAN. They will be sending it over the Internet instead.

If you visit your MyPay site after Sept 1st (good of them to tell us almost two weeks AFTER it goes into effect) you will sign up for online documents automatically (if you are on active duty).

Those of us who have been around computers for more than 20 years thought we would never see the day when the Net was considered secure and Snail Mail was considered insecure.

Saturday, June 04, 2005

China - 16 years ago

This is the 16th anniversary of the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

I post this in the hope that we do not forget what China did, and still does today.

good links for recent news:

http://alekstheblogger.blogspot.com/2005/05/tibet-tiananmen-and-taiwan.html

http://www2.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-05/05/content_439585.htm

For those too young to remember:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananmen_Square_protests_of_1989

http://www.amnesty.org/ailib/intcam/china/eleven_years.htm

While the world tries to forget - China continues their murderous ways, and seeks weapons to modernize their army.

What do we think they will do with modern weapons?

Thursday, May 19, 2005

missing some things from the past

One of the downsides of the ever quickening pace of technology is the loss of some good things we used to be able to get at a reasonable price.

Like a good quality answering machine. True, you can get a digital one today for less than you ever paid for a cassette system, but the sound quality is lousy and if you want one that has multiple outgoing messages (I used to just switch tapes if I was going on a road trip) and can store more than 25 minutes, you will be in a price range higher than the old cassette based ones.